A Great Safari Camp In The Maasai Mara Region

Mara Enkipai Safari Camp


Mara Enkipai Safari Camp Offers:

Lodging Type: Safari Camp

Dining: Safari-style group table, Full board, Room service

Safari: Game Drives, Game Walks, Local Village Visits, Self-drive Game Drive

Facilities: Child - Activities, Showers - Bucket / Bush

Eco & Green: Eco-friendly, Solar Power, Community Development Projects


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About Mara Enkipai Safari Camp

On the banks of the Mara River, Mara Enkipai Safari Camp is a traditional safari camp. The camp is family owned and managed, and is committed to sustainable ecotourism.

There are 8 en-suite tents. All tents have handcrafted furniture created from local materials, and their bathrooms have safari showers. Electricity is provided by solar power. There is an outdoor living area on the riverbank, where tea or sundowners can be served. The chef uses fresh produce grown in the camp’s vegetable garden. Meals can be served in the dining area or on the veranda of a guest’s tent. Picnics can also be provided. Game drives are done in the visitors’ own car; guides are provided by the camp. Other activities include game walks and cultural visits to Maasai villages. Children’s activities include learning how to use bows and arrows with the Maasai, and fishing for catfish in the Mara River.

Several films and documentaries have been filmed at Mara Enkipai Safari Camp, such as The Serengeti Symphony and The Leopard Sun. Mara Enkipai’s Dawntodusk Foundation aims to empower local communities by providing clean water and alternate energy, and by providing training in conservation and tourism skills.

Nearby luxury Jacqueline’s House is named for Jacqueline Roumeguere-Eberhardt, a French social anthropologist famous for her research into the culture and traditions of the Maasai. Jacqueline lived for more than 40 years amongst the Maasai people, studying, filming and photographing their traditions. She married Ole Kapusia, a Maasai moran who was her research assistant throughout her studies.

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